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Thursday, September 7, 2017

George Takei Is Helping Bring an Epic Asian American Romance Saga to Film



Let's all hail George Takei, who made it off the Starship Enterprise decades ago and since become a nerd icon and important human rights activist. He continues to do the Lord's work today by executive producing the film adaptation of author Jamie Ford's wildly popular WWII novel about the heartbreaking romance between a Japanese American boy and a Chinese American girl, HOTEL ON THE CORNER OF BITTER AND SWEET. And may I be the first to say thank you, Sulu.

Hopefully this drama receives the platform it deserves because goodness knows we need to see this kind of representation on the big screen. While the film centers on the love between the two main characters, the war setting and political turmoil are ripe for a major Hollywood saga. It will be great to see not one but two Asian American leads of color on screen (unless Hollywood opts for a white character, which would cause a Twitter riot that I would likely start). 

According to the press release issued yesterday, production begins next year, so no word yet on a release date. Takei is definitely stoked about it, though, which means I'm stoked about it. From the release: “The book tells an intimate love story that is, at once, poignant and sweeping with historic magnitude told against the backdrop of the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII,” says Takei.“I was captivated by Jamie Ford’s novel when I first read it and visualized a compelling film in my mind’s eye. I saw the drama of enduring love despite governmental racism, the passage of time and the vicissitude of life. What a wonderful film it would make. Now we are beginning the exciting adventure of making it happen.”

So far, this is the information we have on the film, which is being co-written by the book's author Jamie Ford:

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet is the story of Henry Lee, a Chinese American boy in Seattle who falls in love with Keiko, a Japanese American girl, as she is sent to an Internment camp during WWII. It is a bittersweet tale about racism, commitment and enduring hope–-a noble romantic journey set in 1942, and later in 1986, when the belongings of Japanese families are discovered in the basement of an old hotel. A widower now, Henry must reconcile the past and the present, the things he did or didn’t do, the things he said, and the things he left unspoken. Set during one of the most conflicted and volatile times in American history, this is a timeless tale of love lost, and found.

Will you support? I know I will. 

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